FPP News: Oct. 19, 2016

Aftermath of Hurricane Matthew

We hope you have recovered from last week. After cleaning up around our own houses, we spent the week speaking with our local farmers to see how they fared through the storm. Thankfully, most of our farmers ended up with very little or no damage as they are mostly inland from Live Oak down to Orange Heights. In fact, I spent the day at The Family Garden on Wednesday. Jordan showed me around his farm located in Gainesville and he showed me all of the crops that were coming in.

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Jordan at his farm, The Family Garden, feeling incredibly lucky the storm didn’t create any damage to his crops.

However, not all of our farmers were so lucky. It was reported that farmers in St. John’s County lost on average 30% to 60% of their planted acreage. That’s nearly 1.5 million dollars in veggies and doesn’t include structures like shadehouses and greenhouses. Our friend and farmer, Ben Wells of St. Augustine, suffered severe damage from both wind and rain and will need to completely start over in the fields and rebuild his greenhouse. Moving south to Volusia County, citrus growers saw 10-50% damage depending on their location, the size of the tree and the size of the fruit.

You can see a slideshow of Mathews destruction here at Growing Produce

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Help support our farms by refering your family, friends, and co-workers

All of us on the FPP Team understand that our customers are our biggest advocates and we want you to know that we greatly appreciate all the love for us and our local farms! For each new member that you refer, you will earn $10.00 in FPP credit good towards any item in our shop. Just ask your referral to use your name when registering.  There are no limits to how many customers — So keep talking!


Featured Items This Week

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The Week’s Harvest

Our Local Producers: Alvarez Farms, Brown’s Farm, Double Blake Farm, Frog Song Organics, Hoover Family Garden, The Family Garden, Promised Land Organics

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Local Box:  Black Eye Peas, Bell Pepper, Organic Tokyo Turnips, Organic Arugula, Organic Breakfast Radish, Organic Cucumber, Organic Yellow Squash, Key Limes, Slicing Tomatoes, North Carolina Apples, 

Organic Box: Local Arugula, Local Cucumber, Local Breakfast Radish, Local Zucchini, Local Tokyo Turnips, Bananas, Lettuce, Yellow Onion, Local Bok Choy, Local Italian Eggplant, Gold Supreme Apples, Local Sweet Potatoes

Fruit Only: Organic bananas, Organic Black Grapes, Organic Pineapple, Organic Gold Supreme Apple, Organic Starcrimson Pear, North Carolina Apples

**please note that items may change due to weather or supply issues.


Veggie Unearthed: Tokyo Turnips

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Your turnips are coming to us from Frog Song Farm in Hawthorne, FL — less than 100 miles from most of our customers’ homes.

This week’s Tokyo turnips will be especially sweet and mild.The smaller size makes for a more tender root and greater flexibility in what dishes you can make with them.  This variety lends a crisp texture that is perfect for eating raw in salads and slaws but also pairs well cooked with their greens.Once you receive your turnips, cut the greens from the roots, then place both in separate loosely wrapped plastic bags in your crisper drawer. The greens can keep for up to about four days, but as with most greens, we suggest you serve them as soon as possible for the highest quality. Turnip roots can keep for longer, but don’t leave in there too long. The flavor may turn bitter over time.

Steaming your turnip greens will help them retain their amazing nutritional properties. Just one cup of the greens contains 661% of your recommended daily allowance of vitamin K and 219% of your vitamin A. Though steaming packs the power punch, we personally love to saute the green just like we would spinach or chard — with olive oil, garlic, and bit of salt and pepper. Hmmm!

Ideas in the kitchen:

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